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Writing in FSX's memory same as FSUIPC did?

Discussion in 'SimConnect' started by Manuel Ambulo, 29/9/06.

  1. Manuel Ambulo

    Manuel Ambulo

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    Hi,

    I just wanted to know if with the new Simconnect, it will be possible to write in FSX's main variables, as FSUIPC did?..(i dont have the FSX SDK...neither the BETA....just asking because FSX went GOLD and i think BETA's period had ended or is ending...). I already had saved the money for buy the new FSX Deluxe (with the SDK inside). :D

    Best Regards,

    Manuel Ambulo
    Last edited: 29/9/06
  2. spotlope

    spotlope FSDevConf team

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    I'm not a programmer, so I can't answer with certainty questions about how to write to memory in FSX, but I do know that Pete Dowson has already released a version of FSUIPC for FSX, and will continue to support the sim. So in that case, little has changed -- except of course for what Pete had to do under the hood. ;)
  3. scruffyduck

    scruffyduck Administrator Staff Member FSDevConf team Resource contributor

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    Looking at the Draft SDK for FSUIPC4 it is certainly possible to read and write most of the offsets in FSX. It seems that not all of them can be done using SimVars, but using Sim Events which are, as I understand it, equivalent to Controls in FS9.
  4. Manuel Ambulo

    Manuel Ambulo

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    Thanks, i didnt knew it was a version of FSUIPC already for FSX, i will look at the documents to see how will FSUIPC work with FSX. But when i had heard about the news of SimConnect and what it will going to do for FSX then i ask myself as anyone like "Then what gonna happen with FSUIPC?", cuz FSUIPC had been for many years one of the best add-on for FS.

    Best Regards,

    Manuel Ambulo
  5. scruffyduck

    scruffyduck Administrator Staff Member FSDevConf team Resource contributor

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    Well the new version of FSUIPC uses Simconnect to communicate with FS as I understand it.
  6. jcboliveira

    jcboliveira

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    Manuel

    The new version was a relief to me. I lost count of how many programs I did FSUIPC based.

    However I took the decision, maybe 1 year ago, of changing from C++ to C# and Simconnect seems a logical step specially due to the events.

    José
  7. Manuel Ambulo

    Manuel Ambulo

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    Yep, FSUIPC is the base or basics for making good FS-Addons...most like: A DEVELOPER'S MUST HAVE..(FSUIPC)

    But the FSX SDK has still documents or references (methods and functions) for C++ programmers? or its all in C#?...i think that if it is in C# its not a big change ...but just asking...lol.. :confused:

    I will save some money for buy C#. I entered to the sites that recommended me scruffyduck, and i see the similarity of C++ and C# so it wont hurt that much moving from C++ to C#, but first i need to buy the C# first...lol.

    Manuel Ambulo
    Last edited: 29/9/06
  8. Pete Dowson

    Pete Dowson

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    No, it is nearly all C++ (or C mostly. No real classes as such). I wouldn't dream of moving to anything as clunky as C# if you know how to use C/C++!

    Why bother? If you know C/C++ then stay with it. I've not even seen the wrappers for SimConnect in C# -- the C/C++ base documents and headers tell you the real story, the one the wrappers wrap-around! Seems to me a step backwards going to C#.

    Regards

    Pete
  9. scruffyduck

    scruffyduck Administrator Staff Member FSDevConf team Resource contributor

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    C# is Free (well the Express Edition which has what you need). You can get it from here http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/express/visualcsharp/

    Have you used C# Pete?
  10. Manuel Ambulo

    Manuel Ambulo

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    Niceee, Thanks Pete, im pleased to heard that most of all is in C/C++ i do really like C/C++ the way it is, but i was thinking that if the FSX SDK was all in C# then that may force me to use C#, (you know that when something new comes up in software, then older things may come obsolete...and so the references for new flightsim may not contain references for C/C++ [i dont know if you got my idea..lol] then that left me thinking as i dont have the FSX SDK...). But its nicer to know that FSX SDK still supports C/C++...:)

    Ohh...well i didnt knew that C# was for free..:eek: ....nice to know its free...well the enterprise...but anyway its free....i will give it a try to see how looks like (now that i know it is 4 free)...but i do really prefer the good old C/C++, i used to program in Visual Basic before C/C++, but since i switch from Basic to C++ (about 3 years ago) i do really like to stay in C++....but of course try something new just to take a look around in C#...:D

    Best Regards,

    Manuel Ambulo
    Last edited: 30/9/06
  11. scruffyduck

    scruffyduck Administrator Staff Member FSDevConf team Resource contributor

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    In that case Manuel you should certainly stay with C++. There is a free download of Visual C++ Express also from Microsoft which should make creating GUI a bit easier.
  12. Pete Dowson

    Pete Dowson

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    No, I looked at it and shivered in horror. Sorry, but I am an assembler language programmer at heart. Even C is really a bit too removed from the nuts and bolts for me, but at least I can understand the assembly code it produces. Even C++ OOP stuff really makes the lower levels really horribly complex (and inefficient -- too much indirection, awful looking code).

    I fail to see why C# has "C" in the name. Looks more like VB/Java or something to me. Horrible.

    Of course this is only my opinion. And at 63 I'm too old to change now (been programming since 1963). Before C was invented I used its predecessor (BCPL, invented at Cambridge here in the UK) for a few years, but always resorting to assembly code for efficiency in main loops and so on. At least today's optimising compilers do quite a good job here -- better that I could when you take pipelining into account.

    But only MS's Pro versions of the compilers are true optimising ones, which is why I have to shell out lots of ££££ for the whole Visual Studio Pro suite -- you can't get the fully optimising compiler on its own.

    So I do have C# and VB.Net and some other stuff I can look at. But use .... nah, not me, thank you! ;-)

    Best Regards,

    Pete
  13. jcboliveira

    jcboliveira

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    Pete

    I know that I can't change your feelings towards C#. I believe that I started programming in Spectrum Z80 Assembly but usually to see how to get infinite lives in a game. :rolleyes:

    Professionally started programming in 89 and for me C was something that allowed me to speed up assembly programming in an 8051 microcontrollers. When I move in to C++ (mainly to use MFC), found out that I couldn't really program in C++. I'm still thinking that classes are struct in steroids nothing more. This thought is something that makes my theoretical colleagues green.

    However c# allowed me to start new. The syntax is C so there wasn’t anything new. But the important thing was to loose contact with the memory, no more pointers and memory reserves. The strict casts and handlers (not the .net since that is anything more than a huge library) allowed me to change the way I do things and I took the decision to begin from scratch: Buy books see examples etc.

    José
  14. scruffyduck

    scruffyduck Administrator Staff Member FSDevConf team Resource contributor

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    Pete

    I completely understand your position on this. We are not that different in age, BTW, and I started with assembler also. In your position I certainly would not change my development tools. You are very effective and create great programs which none of us can do without.

    Personally I don't think C# is that much different than C++ in syntactical terms, a lot of it is to do with the way dotNet works and there is a lot of stuff in C# dealing with those things. It has it's roots in C++ and Java, but I don't think it looks or behaves much like VB :)

    Anyway we could go on for ever arguing which is best and get no where. Much more important is the results of what we do and not the tools we use

    My 2 cents anyway :) :)
  15. Pete Dowson

    Pete Dowson

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    Yes, unfortunately once you see it like that (which is how it looks from lower levels looking up) it is difficult to get to it the way it was intended -- as a top-down programming methodology.

    For 17 years I was either programming test programs for mainframe hardware development and/or field testing, or managing a group doing so. All this was naturally bottom-up programming, never top-down.

    You get stuck into that way of doing things (and enjoy it, which is mostly the point here). I start with the lowest level bits and bobs I need then build a framework on top to utilise them. You can't do that in OOP without wasting the whole point of OOP. It needs a different mind-set to start with.

    This is why I avoid doing application programs (or at least not much more than demos). Low level drivers, interface routines, nuts and bolts: that's me! (After all, someone has to do the dirty work ... <G>).

    Best Regards

    Pete
  16. NotASenator

    NotASenator

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    Pete, this is actually the reason why I love C#. I couldn't get by without the low-level programmers to do the work that needs to be done, but I have two things I need: To be able to look at a program or game from an overall logic flowchart type manner and program it for that, and to be able to sit down and actually start working on making the project do what it's supposed to do, not making the program actually work. It's a subtle difference, but I think you'll understand. I have no joy in optimizing the way my programs allocate memory, I just want to build something that does something and then watch it do it.

    I'm also too much of an idea guy and not enough of a programmer, where I come up with a concept and I want to see what can be done with it. Especially in the realm of game programming, C# and packages like the new XNA framework have made this incredibly easy for me.

    But I realize and accept that none of that would be possible without the guys who get down into the guts and make everything work right, and I respect that.
  17. Manuel Ambulo

    Manuel Ambulo

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    Yes, without people like Pete (that do low-level programming) we couldnt or it wont be possible to have the GOOD! applications we have today. :)

    I do really respect people that does low-level programming, like assembler, because its where the others languages came from..more like where the others languages (like C/C++...then Basic and so on....)....born from.

    Best Regards,

    Manuel Ambulo
  18. Filip Jonckers

    Filip Jonckers

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    I must agree on Pete here...

    C++ is the way to go if you want extremely fast code
    not to mention portability..
    I code a lot in Linux environment too so...

    IVAC & IVAP are still using the dreadful MFC library
    but am glad we now switched to wxwidgets

    A programming language is like a suit .. use the one you're most comfortable in
    well.. I wear my C++ with pride ;)
  19. Filip Jonckers

    Filip Jonckers

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    to get back on topic...

    no - Simconnect is not like FSUIPC

    it uses the typical Microsoft style: sending events and receiving events
    you cannot go into FS and mess things up :)

    but the great thing is that you can also connect remotely and with multiple clients.

    Simconnect has still some rough edges, lots of variables still not as we would like them
    and a lot of them are toggles which makes it hard to use
    Simply SETing the value is the best way to go - but... yep....

    but compared to FS2004 it's a huge step forward
  20. mmodesto

    mmodesto

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    please help

    when I trie to install FSUIPC

    THIS VERSION OF SIMCONECT DOES NOT MATCH FSE.EXE
    INSTALL SIMCONNECTMSI

    ???

    THANK YOU

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