Can someone prolong properly my sound files?

#1
Hello!

I have 9 sound files for an aircraft engine sounds that I am creating.
Some of the files are to short with just 3 seconds.

I tried to prolong them but I can't get good result in that.
What I have done is to copy the original wave to its end and then reverse the copied part.
Still the disturbing clicks can be heard.

I ask your help to prolong the files properly, for example to 8-10 seconds, and the most important thing is to get rid of the disturbing clicks when the sound is repeated.


Here is the download of the sound files:
http://www.mediafire.com/download/1i18s1rq5grbj1d/thrusts.rar

Thank you very much! :wave:
 
#2
Reversing the sounds will seldom work well or sound nice.

The best thing to do is make a take a copy of the sound, place it onto another audio track (I assume you are using Audacity to edit the sounds) and overlap the front of the copy with the tail of the original. Then you just crossfade the two tracks. There are automated ways of doing this but I find you get better results by fading out (reducing the volume) and fading in (increasing the volume) each individual sound clip. Repeat the process as many times as needed (and a little bit more, see below) to get the required sound length.

This will also help with the clicks when repeating. If you trim off half of the first sound clip and then trim off half of the last sound clip that you have copied then you will have a seamless loop.
 
#3
Reversing the sounds will seldom work well or sound nice.

The best thing to do is make a take a copy of the sound, place it onto another audio track (I assume you are using Audacity to edit the sounds) and overlap the front of the copy with the tail of the original. Then you just crossfade the two tracks. There are automated ways of doing this but I find you get better results by fading out (reducing the volume) and fading in (increasing the volume) each individual sound clip. Repeat the process as many times as needed (and a little bit more, see below) to get the required sound length.

This will also help with the clicks when repeating. If you trim off half of the first sound clip and then trim off half of the last sound clip that you have copied then you will have a seamless loop.
Thank you for the answer!

You mean to merge two waves into one file?
For example, I had a shutdown sound by itself. But when you shut down the engines in the Simulator it doesn't sound good because it's not smooth and the shutdown sound jumps suddenly.
So what I done is to take one file of idle and the second file the shutdown itself.
Then I mixed them together: The idle sound is played for 1-2 seconds and was in fade out.
Then the shutdown sound begun and was in fade in at the time that the idle was in fade out.
So in this way I recreated the shutdown sound.
Is that what you mean?
Can you please show as example how you would do it on one of the files? For example the file 9.wav.

Thank you!
 
#4
It would look something like this (using the freeware Audacity editor):

Image1.jpg


There are two tracks. I have taken the first clip and copied it to the second track, copied it again to the first track but moved it back and finally another copy on the second track at the end.

The first clip has been faded out where it overlaps with the second clip and the second clip has been faded in. This has been repeated for the overlaps.

Finally you can see that I have highlighted between 3 and 24 seconds (although, now that I look at it I should have highlighted between 3 and 22.5 seconds). As the first clip is the same as the last clip they will seamlessly loop if I trim off the ends.
 
#5
As far as I'm aware regardless of the sound file length the cfg will only play the first 3 seconds then loop. I've tried lengthening files in the past with no effect.
 
#6
It would look something like this (using the freeware Audacity editor):

View attachment 24556

There are two tracks. I have taken the first clip and copied it to the second track, copied it again to the first track but moved it back and finally another copy on the second track at the end.

The first clip has been faded out where it overlaps with the second clip and the second clip has been faded in. This has been repeated for the overlaps.

Finally you can see that I have highlighted between 3 and 24 seconds (although, now that I look at it I should have highlighted between 3 and 22.5 seconds). As the first clip is the same as the last clip they will seamlessly loop if I trim off the ends.
Thank you for the answer!
But I don't understand you exactly.
Why you have there two tracks? Do you mean two different tracks from two different files?
And why did you highlight 3 to 24 seconds? It's not exactly 3 as I see but a little bit above 3.
And how do you find exactly the full cycle of the wave - when you know that if this cycle is repeated it will sound correct?
Because here is the main problem to find the full cycle of the wave. If I just copy a random part of the wave and prolong this part it may sound very bad with no full cycle. That's what I mean.

And could you try that on one of my files to me understand?
Thanks!
 
#9
Why you have there two tracks? Do you mean two different tracks from two different files?
Because the clips (they are all the same clip) overlap and in Audacity it will not play back two clips if they are on one track. You need the clips to overlap so that you can fade between the end and start of the clips without having a drastic change in the tone of the sounds. When you export the file it will mix the two tracks into one.

And why did you highlight 3 to 24 seconds? It's not exactly 3 as I see but a little bit above 3.
Who cares if it is not exactly three. I'm just going to give you guidelines here and it is up to you to apply them to your situation. In this case the clip is 7.5 seconds long so copying it 4 times and overlapping gives a total length of about 27 seconds.

And how do you find exactly the full cycle of the wave - when you know that if this cycle is repeated it will sound correct?
Look at the waveform. The first clip and the last are the same so if you set the start and end points of the loop the same distance into each clip then they will seamlessly repeat. Do the following:
The first clip will be at time zero.
Now zoom into somewhere in the middle of the first clip. Zoom in far enough that you can see each individual sample, look for one that crosses the horizontal zero line.
Note the exact time on the timeline.
Go to the last clip, zoom into the start and note the exact time.
Add the time you noted from the first clip to the start time of the last clip and zoom into this new time on the timeline.
Trim the end off the last clip from this new time onwards.
Go back to the first clip and trim off the start of the clip up to the first time you noted.
The end of your new sound will now perfectly loop.


Because here is the main problem to find the full cycle of the wave. If I just copy a random part of the wave and prolong this part it may sound very bad with no full cycle. That's what I mean.
see above

And could you try that on one of my files to me understand?
I'm rather busy doing my own work at the moment.

BTW, I've made engine sounds longer than 3 seconds just fine.
 
#11
Why you have there two tracks? Do you mean two different tracks from two different files?
Because the clips (they are all the same clip) overlap and in Audacity it will not play back two clips if they are on one track. You need the clips to overlap so that you can fade between the end and start of the clips without having a drastic change in the tone of the sounds. When you export the file it will mix the two tracks into one.

And why did you highlight 3 to 24 seconds? It's not exactly 3 as I see but a little bit above 3.
Who cares if it is not exactly three. I'm just going to give you guidelines here and it is up to you to apply them to your situation. In this case the clip is 7.5 seconds long so copying it 4 times and overlapping gives a total length of about 27 seconds.

And how do you find exactly the full cycle of the wave - when you know that if this cycle is repeated it will sound correct?
Look at the waveform. The first clip and the last are the same so if you set the start and end points of the loop the same distance into each clip then they will seamlessly repeat. Do the following:
The first clip will be at time zero.
Now zoom into somewhere in the middle of the first clip. Zoom in far enough that you can see each individual sample, look for one that crosses the horizontal zero line.
Note the exact time on the timeline.
Go to the last clip, zoom into the start and note the exact time.
Add the time you noted from the first clip to the start time of the last clip and zoom into this new time on the timeline.
Trim the end off the last clip from this new time onwards.
Go back to the first clip and trim off the start of the clip up to the first time you noted.
The end of your new sound will now perfectly loop.


Because here is the main problem to find the full cycle of the wave. If I just copy a random part of the wave and prolong this part it may sound very bad with no full cycle. That's what I mean.
see above

And could you try that on one of my files to me understand?
I'm rather busy doing my own work at the moment.

BTW, I've made engine sounds longer than 3 seconds just fine.
Thanks but it's difficult for me to understand that, maybe also because it's on english.
I have idea, maybe you will be able to enter my computer one day when you have time via Team Viewer for example and make this on real time?
It will not take many time.
Thanks!
 
#12
In my case where I started with one original wav file. I adjusted it in Audacity to get rid of too much bass. Then eliminated as many clicks as possible. There is still one which I can't locate. But it's a minor problem. Using Audacity I then excentuated the wave peaks. I found this necessary for this particular wave file as it didn't sound right within the sim unless that was done(your files may sound totally different). The upshot of that was that the sound file sounded ok within the sim but atrocious when played outside the sim. The next step was to illiminate areas that repeated every 3 seconds and replace them with more bland segments. For the LP compressor I used the same file but cut it in different places so that the wave peaks in both the HP and LP sounds were misaligned when played together. Coupled with the different rates of pitch as the engines spooled up the result was pretty authentic. In the real aircraft the engines have a characteristic howl while idling and taxing. I have been able to reproduce this quite successfully due to the different pitch curves.
I'm afraid it's no 5 minute job. Even after you have satisfactory wav files you'll have to play around with pitch and volume until it sounds more or less correct.
 
#13
In my case where I started with one original wav file. I adjusted it in Audacity to get rid of too much bass. Then eliminated as many clicks as possible. There is still one which I can't locate. But it's a minor problem. Using Audacity I then excentuated the wave peaks. I found this necessary for this particular wave file as it didn't sound right within the sim unless that was done(your files may sound totally different). The upshot of that was that the sound file sounded ok within the sim but atrocious when played outside the sim. The next step was to illiminate areas that repeated every 3 seconds and replace them with more bland segments. For the LP compressor I used the same file but cut it in different places so that the wave peaks in both the HP and LP sounds were misaligned when played together. Coupled with the different rates of pitch as the engines spooled up the result was pretty authentic. In the real aircraft the engines have a characteristic howl while idling and taxing. I have been able to reproduce this quite successfully due to the different pitch curves.
I'm afraid it's no 5 minute job. Even after you have satisfactory wav files you'll have to play around with pitch and volume until it sounds more or less correct.
Yes, that's exactly what I also do - I use the tool Bass and Treble in Audacity.
It doesn't have to take many time - I mean only the sound file edit itself.
After that the change in the sound configuration is not problem.
 
#14
I downloaded your sounds to take a look and the problem with trying to loop those sounds is that the raw materials are too little. I believe these are suppose to be for different engine power settings? You want to have several clips of the same power setting and then try joining them together. Trying to loop a 2 second clip is possible but it will still be audible as a loop and would be very unrealistic. I saw from the video in your other thread you can get longer sections of the power settings, cut out the parts where there are people talking and join those together. You would have a better and longer clip that way than trying to loop from a 1 - 2 sec clip.

As for your power down sound. You'll want to create it from the idle sound so that the sound can flow from the idle state to the shutdown state. I've not actually tried programming sounds into the FS before but thats how its done in other situations when creating transitions. Based on your clip 9, you'll want to use a filter (High Pass Filter) to remove the low rumbling to create the sound of the compressor (I don't know my engines well so pardon me if I get it wrong), loop it a few times to create a longer clip, then apply a pitch down effect to simulate it spinning down. I noticed that there are two or possibly more compressors spinning down so you'll want to stack them. You can stretch one of the clips slightly longer so that it takes a longer time to spin down and maybe pitch it up or down slightly to create tiny variation.

I've created quick edit for you to have an idea of how that might sound. After doing this and checking the video again it seems that the idle sound is actually clip 1 but you should be able to do the same technique with that clip too.

http://cl.ly/dNpo
 
#15
I downloaded your sounds to take a look and the problem with trying to loop those sounds is that the raw materials are too little. I believe these are suppose to be for different engine power settings? You want to have several clips of the same power setting and then try joining them together. Trying to loop a 2 second clip is possible but it will still be audible as a loop and would be very unrealistic. I saw from the video in your other thread you can get longer sections of the power settings, cut out the parts where there are people talking and join those together. You would have a better and longer clip that way than trying to loop from a 1 - 2 sec clip.

As for your power down sound. You'll want to create it from the idle sound so that the sound can flow from the idle state to the shutdown state. I've not actually tried programming sounds into the FS before but thats how its done in other situations when creating transitions. Based on your clip 9, you'll want to use a filter (High Pass Filter) to remove the low rumbling to create the sound of the compressor (I don't know my engines well so pardon me if I get it wrong), loop it a few times to create a longer clip, then apply a pitch down effect to simulate it spinning down. I noticed that there are two or possibly more compressors spinning down so you'll want to stack them. You can stretch one of the clips slightly longer so that it takes a longer time to spin down and maybe pitch it up or down slightly to create tiny variation.

I've created quick edit for you to have an idea of how that might sound. After doing this and checking the video again it seems that the idle sound is actually clip 1 but you should be able to do the same technique with that clip too.

http://cl.ly/dNpo
Thank you for the answer but that's not what I mean.
I have succeed to create not bad shutdown sounds using the idle (1.wav) and the shutdown sounds itself, combining both of them to have a smooth transition from idle to shutdown. The idle is in fade out while the shutdown wave itself is in fade in, together they give continuous smooth shutdown.
What you did is using the maximal power so it's cannot be used for shutdown.

I think that sounds not bad now:


(the format is 3GP so the quality is not clear)

(the format is 3GP so the quality is not clear)
 
Last edited:
#16
Can you please show as example how you would do it on one of the files? For example the file 9.wav.
I used the file cause I glanced over your request above before I realised it much later after I was done that it wasn't the idle sound. Was rushing to make a quick edit so that I can get you the steps before realising there was a more appropriate file to use.

I'm glad to hear that you got your sound files working for you.
 
#17
I used the file cause I glanced over your request above before I realised it much later after I was done that it wasn't the idle sound. Was rushing to make a quick edit so that I can get you the steps before realising there was a more appropriate file to use.

I'm glad to hear that you got your sound files working for you.
Thanks!
But I meant in file 9.wav just for an example to prolong the file correctly, and not for power down effect.
 
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