Dual boot Windows XP 32 bit and Windows 7 64 bit

jtanabodee

Resource contributor
#1
Hi,
I found so many problems with my system and Win 7 64 bit and my kids want some of their old game to be able to run. Fixing some games and programs to be able to run on 64 bit system is quite difficult for me. So I am thinking of dual boot both system in the same computer. Some of scenery making programs do not run on 64 bit. So I think I am going to do that.
Are there any caution or bad things to do this ?
 

hairyspin

Resource contributor
#2
I used to do that Tic, worked really well. I used EasyBCD to set it up, although I don’t know if it’s still available. I’d make sure XP can’t access the interweb, though.
 

=rk=

Resource contributor
#4
I used to run a W10/W7 dual boot and still get the prompt, even though the W7 hard drive died years ago and has since been removed. It seems like an operating system emulator would be adequate for your needs, while protecting you from the vulnerabilities of the XP operating system. Even further into ancient times, I used Macintosh platform and ran an XP emulator in my Lombard laptop and aside from being incredibly slow, it worked great.
https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=8002
 

jtanabodee

Resource contributor
#5
Thanks Tom, Rick. I forgot about vulnerabilities of XP and internet.
It seem to be a good choice. So, do you find that it is perfect to run any programs including games?
 
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=rk=

Resource contributor
#6
I think in today's computing environment, given the complexity of the games that were released in the era of XP, you should have no problems, unless your computer is extremely modest. The link I posted was for Windows software, the only cost being that you view the Surface Pro advert, so you could certainly try it to see if it works for you before deciding to switch to the dual boot system.
 

Ronald

Resource contributor
#7
I forgot about vulnerabilities of XP and internet.
You can also protect your XP by
A - Install a XP-compatible firewall that blocks all (inbound/outbound) connections.
B - Temporarily disableing your TCP-IP protocol stack so nothing outside can access your XP-box anymore.
I will add an example of a little batch-file I've used for this purpose later this day.
 

jtanabodee

Resource contributor
#8
Great, I will try system emulator first. If it seem to be not so good, I will change to dual boot and disable it from TCP-IP protocol.
 

jtanabodee

Resource contributor
#9
Oh, I think it is getting more complicated. Not as easy as I thought before. I think I will install WinXP to another hard drive. I can choose which hard drive will boot. It is simpler and easier to do.
 

hairyspin

Resource contributor
#10
Definitely use a second hd for your XP installation, forgot to say that. I also set up each hd to offer dual boot in case the machine defaults to booting from the second hd - it happened...
 

=rk=

Resource contributor
#11
Definitely use a second hd for your XP installation, forgot to say that. I also set up each hd to offer dual boot in case the machine defaults to booting from the second hd - it happened...
Any Windows operating system has the ability to select the boot drive, you can do it from the operating system, or from the BIOS and if you lose your boot.ini, such that the computer appears to default to some other drive/OS, you can write a new one. Here are tutorials for multiple ways to do both in W10:
http://www.thewindowsclub.com/change-boot-defaults-options-dual-booting-windows-10
https://www.lifewire.com/how-to-access-advanced-startup-options-in-windows-10-or-8-2626229

To me, it seems like installing a second hard drive, configuring it, and managing boot options is a lot more technical and prone to undesirable results than installing a emulator. Why would I have even recommended it, I am starting to wonder...I think like so many things in life, we prefer the journey over the destination, so I will allow you your explorations, enjoy.
 
#12
On my "Multi-Media" PC, I have a dual boot Win10/WinXP on a single drive... no issues. Just separate partitions. The reason was to use an emulator which I can then run Flight Simulator versions 1 thru whatever. I guess up to when a Windows FS version was introduced. Did a lot of reading up on it before attempting. If I remember it was better to start from scratch installing both platforms. I think it suggested install XP first? (it's been years since the install so not quite sure).

Anywho, lot's of fun see the progression of FS thru the many versions.
 
#13
I think it suggested install XP first?
It is. I did it as well and had both running like a charm (XP@32bits/Win7@64bits). However... I don't know if the XP activation process would be a problem nowadays... If I can recall, after activation was done, I never connected the XP system to internet again.

Regarding emulators... I wouldn't use them; because they are resource hungry. Afterall, if you choose to use this method, you will be running a virtual machine inside a host operating system which also need resources. As Rick said, it is entirely up to you. And don't be afraid to experiment in this regard, just backup your precious files first!

Good luck and have fun!
 
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