Installing FSX and FS2004

#1
Hi all,

Can anyone tell me :

Is it ok to put FSX and FS2004 on the same hard drive which is running windows 7 home premium (64 bit version) ?
If ok, is there any specific order to install i.e FS2004 first then FSX etc.

Many thanks.
 
#4
One other quick question that i forgot in my initial post :

If you are installing both FSX and FS2004 on same hard drive is it best to go outside the usual default installation route i.e C:/FSX and C:/FS2004 ?

I read that somewhere but can remember if it was the case. Hopefully someone can put me right.

Many thanks.
 

hairyspin

Resource contributor
#5
Yes. It saves endless fights with the UAC when modifying things or adding downloads. You can always turn the UAC off altogether, but you might not want to do that.
 
A

amahran

Guest
#6
Yes. It saves endless fights with the UAC when modifying things or adding downloads. You can always turn the UAC off altogether, but you might not want to do that.
I've turned UAC off with the default installation path in the program files, and installed all my tools in the program files. No problems there...

It's just a matter of knowing what you're downloading and running... ;)
 
#7
I've turned UAC off with the default installation path in the program files, and installed all my tools in the program files. No problems there...

It's just a matter of knowing what you're downloading and running... ;)
Many thanks for replies,

I am running Win 7 64 bit, and will be using the usual programs like :
ADE, GMAX, Library CreatorXML and Model ConvertX etc. As i have got interchangable hard drives on my pc, i wont be running much else as i want to keep this for FS development.
Regards.
 
A

amahran

Guest
#8
UAC = off
As long as you don't download any programs that might mess with your system files, it should be alright....
 

scruffyduck

Administrator
Staff member
FSDevConf team
Resource contributor
#9
Generally while it is fine to turn UAC if you understand what that means; I do not - I prefer to get a warning when I install a new application and it also deals with the situation where something less than friendly attempts to silently install something. The simple answer is not to install FS9 and FSX in the default (program files) folder structure. This causes no problems or issues with the sims but does avoid any potential issues with UAC.
 
A

amahran

Guest
#10
IMO I've always seen UAC as the "nagging kid."

It's only safe to turn it off when you know EXACTLY what you're doing.
besides, I like the idea of everything being in it's default installation path, it get's kinda cozy and organised...

Then again, to each man his own, right? ;)
 

n4gix

Resource contributor
#11
IMO I've always seen UAC as the "nagging kid."

It's only safe to turn it off when you know EXACTLY what you're doing.
besides, I like the idea of everything being in it's default installation path, it get's kinda cozy and organised...

Then again, to each man his own, right? ;)
You're kidding, right? FS9 and FSX on either Vista or Win7 are anything but "organized."

I also hate the rediculously long path names, especially the SDK's default installation path!
 
A

amahran

Guest
#12
I dunno, it seems organised on my system...

But don't you think we're straying away from the subject here?
Even by just a bit?
Just a tiny little bit?
 

n4gix

Resource contributor
#13
Not really, as they are part and parcel of the OP's question.

FWIW, I have the following versions of FS9 and FSX installed on my main flightsim test machine:

D:\FS9
D:\FS9_Virgin
D:\FS9_SDK
D:\FSX
D:\FSX_Virgin
D:\FSX_SDK
 
A

amahran

Guest
#14
As I said, to each man his own, but the I have a feeling that the last few posts are going to spark an internet argument, and we all know no-one gains from an internet argument.

So LET'S JUST WRAP THIS UP (shall we?)
If you'd like to install it in a path that differs from the default installation path, then you can do that, there's no problem in that, and in fact is encouraged. The gain would be no problems with UAC if it is turned on and a short file pathway.
However, If you'd like to install them both in the default installation path (the program files), then it would be less of a hassle to turn UAC off, which is not recommended if you run a lot of unfamiliar programs. The only gain out of this is, well...symmetry, as all the programs you will have are in the program files.

I, for one, don't run anything unfamiliar, and I also have some sort of OCD, so I stuff it in the program files and turn UAC off.
Others may attempt different approaches, but, once again, "To each man his own"
If anyone would like to correct me, feel free to, because I'm sure I would interfere with lots of opinions (or facts for that matter)

(I have a feeling the OP stopped caring for these posts)
 
#15
Many thanks to all you all for taking the time to reply. On my other machine i have got FSX with Win 7, so far never had any problems with UAC. So hopefully will continue.

Regards.
 
#16
Just some observations. No argument here.

My experience with UAC. Yours may be different.

What it won’t do.

1. It won’t protect you from viruses. I can’t tell you how many computers I’ve cleaned that had UAC turned on, but got nasties. Besides, viruses go for the registry and Windows folders.

B. It won’t organize your computer. You do that. I think the only reason so many programs want to install to the C:\ Programs folder is because then folks don’t have to think. MS has provided a default place to install things. That doesn’t make it the best place. Even then, 32 bit and 64 bit programs get installed in different folders. Folks who use their computers for more that surfing and email might have more that one drive, and can take care of themselves. It can be a shock for those coming from XP to find out that their account in W7 is not automatically an administrator account. While having a low permissions account is safer online, it can be a pain for those who know a little more about using a computer

2. It won’t make you happy. After all, being happy is the most important thing.


What it will do.

1. It will make it difficult for someone to alter your files by mistake or on purpose. If you are the only person that uses your computer, you may not need this protection. Remember the first time you tried to alter that cfg file only to not be granted permission? To bypass this all you had to do was open Notepad first, browse to the file, alter and save. So much for protection.

Yes, if you are having trouble getting something to run, right click and run as administrator. Again, kind of defeats the purpose of UAC, don’t you think?

One last rant. Seems to me that if companies want me to use the web for everything (life in the cloud) then they ought to supply for free AV that works. No such thing. If the Pentagon gets hacked, what hope is there for the rest of us? I know, some will say “You should use “blah blah”. I use it and have never had a virus.” Really? How do you know? Because a scan never showed one? Viruses today can totally hide themselves. The best hope one has to run at least one rootkit scanner. Two or three are even better. That, or reinstall the OS every few months. Wait, some of us do that anyway. Not always by choice.

To stay on topic...

I did hear of a few cases where someone had both sims on one HDD, and tried to deleat on, and then the other wouldn't start. But I suspect those computers might have had other problems.

Bob
 
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