Modelling interior parts separately?

#1
I was wondering if it was a good idea to model different switches, panels, etc outside of the main VC file and then import them into a modelled VC and just make them part of the same object. I've made my overhead panel completely outside of the VC which I have yet to make, but I think this would complicate the actual VC modelling without said panel, but if I were to model it from inside the VC file, the panel would be at an angle and I would have no solid reference to an image behind it.
 

hairyspin

Resource contributor
#2
I don’t know which modelling program you’re using, but you should be able to hide parts of a model when convenient and work only on the parts you want. Gmax and Max do this beautifully (I use Named Selection Sets for convenience or layers (Max only)) and I’d be astonished if Blender didn’t too.

I’ve always found this essential when modelling in restricted areas like the VC.
 
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#3
You could model the parts on another computer at University in another state, then bring them home on hard drive and import them. You could email them to yourself so they arrive 'airmail' or 'virtual mail', then import them. You could purchase parts online at places like TurboSquid and import those if they are importable. You could possibly make parts on an Apple computer and if they are in the right format, import them to Windows (in file format) and bring them into your VC. Or just make them in the scene itself.

What I do is empty the scene (hide everything with that 'light bulb' button icon on the bottom of Max) except for maybe one part for scale, and make the parts I need, then unhide, move to fit, etc, etc, etc. Makes it easier on the eyes.

And the first paragraph I wrote above was only have way humorous.. ;) So many ways to do things.
 
#4
And as for modeling things on slanted panels, you could always model it vertical, save a backup version, select everything on the panel, and then rotate the whole thing to its normal angle. The named selection trick would come in handy there.
 
#5
And as for modeling things on slanted panels, you could always model it vertical, save a backup version, select everything on the panel, and then rotate the whole thing to its normal angle. The named selection trick would come in handy there.
I have done that more then once.. Perhaps 3 times. My Learjet was done that way. Built it on the panel diagram, then tilted it in the cockpit and fit it in.
 

hairyspin

Resource contributor
#6
And as for modeling things on slanted panels, you could always model it vertical, save a backup version, select everything on the panel, and then rotate the whole thing to its normal angle. The named selection trick would come in handy there.
Yep, or you can use custom grids in Gmax/3ds Max to build things on all sorts of squinty angles to match the final alignment, but that's another topic altogether.
 
#7
And as for modeling things on slanted panels, you could always model it vertical, save a backup version, select everything on the panel, and then rotate the whole thing to its normal angle. The named selection trick would come in handy there.
I love to work vertical on panels that sit at an angle. Saves a ton of time on busy panels and i do not have to constantly change the rotate and move to local or parent settings. I group them to rotate. But as a warning if you do use groups you need to make sure you animations are using TCP rotation and TCP position if you group and un group. Or the animation will lose their original path.
 
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