Substance B2M ... too good to be true?

I'm very new to Substance and 3D Modeling, so bare with me ... B2M seems to be an incredibly good tool to improve workflow ... one stop shop for diffuse image sources ... do I really need any other tool for PBR materials?

B2M seems to have the ability to tile a diffuse image seamlessly and even randomize tiles so as to avoid repeating patterns. Is B2M the primary tool of choice as it seems to be able to do just about everything one would want in terms of PBR and P3D (and I assume for XP11 also).

Drop a diffuse image into B2M and one has Base Color, Roughness map, Metalic map, Normal map, Height map, and Ambient Occlusion map ... but what about Transparency?

B2M almost seems too good to be true, like maybe I missed something obvious or just don't have the experience to see it's issues ... so before I get too far down the B2M wedding, would love to get others thoughts and experiences? Is it too good to be true, what snakes and ladders can I expect?

Cheers, Rob.
 
Hi Rob

Its not to good to be true, its an amassing program. Unfortunately it seems they have replaced it with Substance Alchemist, witch is a Simplified , more automatic program. So it has Forced me to use Substance designer witch is to complicated.
I hate Alogoryphic for this decision, hold onto B2M wile you still can, my licencing has made it inaccessible for me.
 
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Same as Nagmaal says, it has been replaced by Alchemist which is way more powerful than B2M. Is good and handy to use and it has become a pretty handy tool even in blockbuster films and AAA games, but still you need to know how to play around it correctly as this is an automated software so it tries its best to guess the values but not always they are going to be correct or you just want to tweak it to give it your own artistic touch.
 
Ok will hold onto it as long as possible. Do you happen to know if there are any tools that can speed up the emissive map process? My only reference on creating emissive is this video using Substance Painter:


This method is similar but a little more simplified:


As you can see, this is a pretty lengthy process and I can't imagine doing this for every emissive area for my airport buildings.

Cheers, Rob.
 
Emissive maps, in general, are just a mask or a coloured mask which when input tells the render engine what part of the mesh he needs to light up. Based on that you can easily take a mask in Photoshop and paint the parts you want and call it an emissive map. Emissive in Substance Painter looks quite blown away so don't worry about that when you see your lights so bright inside Painter. And according to the P3D SDK, you can tweak the intensity of your emissive maps with MTL scripting, which is done in LUA.

As you can see you can have a Black and White Emissive map, normally known as alpha and then with scripting you can tell the engine in which colour you want these lights up and the intensity or you can already have it coloured like in this example:

Regarding tutorials these two videos are short and sweet:



As demonstrated in the videos you can use the brush, stamps etc... or you can use the fill layer and enable your emissive channel so you can brighten up those lights :D!
 
Also regarding Substance B2M. I will easily just migrate to Alchemist instead of holding onto it. Is easy to use and don't discourage by its UI or its power. It is true that is very flexible with SD but you don't really have to know how to use it to use Alchemist. Also, answering your transparency question I don't have any knowledge that Alchemist or B2M can generate these from albedo, so it is most likely you will have to do them on another application. I did this material and rendered it in Marmoset in like 15 minutes from a picture I found online.
screenshot000.png

screenshot001.png

As you can see it is pretty amazing what you can do with it in such short time :O!
 
Thanks for the responses, I've just put aside B2M and embraced Alchemist ... OMG! I'm bubbling with excitement over Alchemist ... wow! Drag and drop image and it auto generates normal, roughness, metallic, height, and AO and I can adjust each ... and the Tiling layer/FX is fantastic ... randomize it ... add some dirt, maybe a little oxidation and viola! This is going to keep me busy for a while ... I'm a big fan of the weathered look.

Unfortunately the "delighted" FX layer isn't working with this current version ... I have the appropriate GPU and VRAM but doesn't seem to recognize it ... seems the Substance devs are aware of the issue and working on a fix.

As far as 3DSMax lights are concerned, it seems that I don't use/add any 3DSMax lights when working with P3D projects.

Cheers, Rob.
 
Hi,

In freeware solutions, I found Materialize and ModLab. Theses two software can create diffuse/height/normal/metallic/etc ... maps very easily.
That is true indeed both of them are pretty good and instead of B2M I would have use Materialize or Pixplant (This last one is paid) But Materialize is an excellent freeware alternative. Though right now the best one is by far Alchemist.
 
Thanks for the responses, I've just put aside B2M and embraced Alchemist ... OMG! I'm bubbling with excitement over Alchemist ... wow! Drag and drop image and it auto generates normal, roughness, metallic, height, and AO and I can adjust each ... and the Tiling layer/FX is fantastic ... randomize it ... add some dirt, maybe a little oxidation and viola! This is going to keep me busy for a while ... I'm a big fan of the weathered look.

Unfortunately the "delighted" FX layer isn't working with this current version ... I have the appropriate GPU and VRAM but doesn't seem to recognize it ... seems the Substance devs are aware of the issue and working on a fix.

As far as 3DSMax lights are concerned, it seems that I don't use/add any 3DSMax lights when working with P3D projects.

Cheers, Rob.
No worries Rob, if you have any questions regarding texturing topics or PBR just PM me, will be more than happy to help :) Can't wait to see that projects of yours to come alive. Regarding the 3DS Max light well I use mainly Maya and I am still learning as well about Scenery design so I don't have an answer for that one.
 
Started learning Substance Designer, and O my word its an amazingly powerful piece of software. Steep learning curve though, but super powerful.
 
I do have questions, but slowly figuring them out and ask as little as possible until I'm stuck. It seems one should NOT do any lights in 3DSMax ... so I'm using FXTool and ADE to setup lights. I'll do emissive for generic buildings window lights to save of performance ... but what I've noticed is that P3D seems to over expose emissive, have to really dial it back A LOT. I've also noticed that in some of ORBX's work where some buildings at night will GLOW like a white hot giant light bulb, especially in GB South product. But I've seen several other vendors with objects that glow at night and I'm assuming it's an emissive issue or is it something else? It's a huge distraction and obvious flaw and something I want to make sure I avoid ... so any tips on emissive are welcome.

Cheers, Rob.
 
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