P3D v2 T-346A

Ronald

Resource contributor
I see that you have discovered some nice detailed landing grey blueprints... Looking forward to see the main landing gears :)
 
If you don’t mind me asking...Do you use subdivision smoothing for all of these small parts like the landing gear, and then optimize each part to reduce the poly count? Because they look extremely smooth, but that implies a LOT of polygons...
 

SixGhost

Resource contributor
Roland, the blueprints I have don't match actual photos, what you see is plain old eyeball mk.I and lots of pictures.

Ozzy, I don't generally use subd unless I have a particularly odd shape and can't get around it by more traditional ways. Keep in mind these are renders, the combination of a barely reflective shader and Max antialiasing, paired with hard chamfers here and there, do make that impression. In reality, it's just a bunch of cylinders ranging from 6 to 16 sides. You can see that in some places. That said, being more detailed on average, I spend a lot of time optimizing the mesh anyway. There are no stray edge loops or unnecessary vertices, if it doesn't affect the shape I want in any way, down the toilet it goes.:)
 
Roland, the blueprints I have don't match actual photos, what you see is plain old eyeball mk.I and lots of pictures.

Ozzy, I don't generally use subd unless I have a particularly odd shape and can't get around it by more traditional ways. Keep in mind these are renders, the combination of a barely reflective shader and Max antialiasing, paired with hard chamfers here and there, do make that impression. In reality, it's just a bunch of cylinders ranging from 6 to 16 sides. You can see that in some places. That said, being more detailed on average, I spend a lot of time optimizing the mesh anyway. There are no stray edge loops or unnecessary vertices, if it doesn't affect the shape I want in any way, down the toilet it goes.:)
I’m just envious of how you got such smooth junctions between tubes and such...those are absolutely gorgeous. Almost like they were made in SolidWorks or something.
 

SixGhost

Resource contributor
That's easy! If the two tubes have the same diameter and the same number of sides, it's just a matter of doing a 45° V cut where they meet and chamfering all the resulting edges apart from the 2 at the very apex of the V. A bit of manual editing to clean up some stray vertices, fix the edge flow and you're done.



If the tubes have different diameters that's more complicated, the only way to make it look good is to increase the resolution of the mesh locally or use subd and hope for the best.
 

SixGhost

Resource contributor
I'm the opposite. The more I can avoid TS the happier I am, it feels like it takes away so much control over what I do, especially if I need to work within fixed constraints.

And if I start to use TS indiscriminately somebody here will burn me alive!:D:D:D:D
 

hairyspin

Resource contributor
I believe the really good TurboSmooth modellers carefully optimise their meshes before applying the modifier. What you see above is the legacy of sims and rigs of yore when smart building was a necessity and Luca learned from some of the masters of those days. People showed their mesh more often then, too: I learned a few things from them and could do with applying their methods more often.
 

SixGhost

Resource contributor
I still remember when Gerard gave me his 109 to build a pit for. Feeling half honoured half proud of myself since he didn't give away his sources so easily, I was the chosen one lol!:D:D:D I studied every inch of that mesh. It made me a better modeller. His 109 and his legacy are in every vertex I draw. I bet in some of yours too, Tom.;) Damn I miss big G.
 
Honestly I do your technique on post #34, but that made increasing huge amount of poly count. in addition of turbo smooth that make extreme high poly count. for 2D/3D render purpose I think very high poly count is much better, but in 3D gaming it could be worse.
 

SixGhost

Resource contributor
Maryadi, the technique I was describing is meant to be used mainly on small items, where you cannot afford to do a proper chamfer, let alone using turbosmooth. It is also commonly used before applying turbosmooth to better control your mesh, but that's another story altogether. Using both TS AND that technique everywhere, as you said, is not advisable for real time modelling.
 
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