tutorial on making aircraft for FSX...don't have ideas for the name of this thread

#1
Hi... I'm Michael Jordan...jk
Hello, you beautiful people. Since I am pretty new in this kind of thang, I would like to hear from all of the aircraft developers, a little tutorial (not from any other site, because I have read all of those)
I would also like to know how to develop aerodynamics and 3D modelling for gauges so that I can make a nice freeware in the future for the whole Flight SIm community. If you have some information or resources where I can learn FSX aerodynamics and 3D modelling, would really appreciate if you could give me the information!

Kind Regards,
Ivica
 

hairyspin

Resource contributor
#2
Us? Beautiful?? Time you visited the optometrist! Well, many of us learned aircraft modelling from all those other sites and their tutorials, so if you can’t find anything new here you may have overlooked the really good ones we used. Milton Shupe’s Gmax tutorials are excellent (and also for 3ds Max) and Krispy1000’s tutorials are also well regarded for Blender. Just pick a 3d modelling tool from these and stick with it (important).

For flight modelling, really your best bet is starting with AirWrench 2 which takes the parameters you supply and turns out a working flight model. Just like that. If that sounds too easy, you need a lot of data for it to build a competent flight model. The software includes documentation. The dedicated .air file editors come later when you understand better what to edit and why to tweak the flight behaviour.

That should keep you out of mischief for at least 5000 hours. Not kidding, you have a heap to learn!
 
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#3
Us? Beautiful?? Time you visited the optometrist! Well, many of us learned aircraft modelling from all those other sites and their tutorials, so if you can’t find anything new here you may have overlooked the really good ones we used. Milton Shupe’s Gmax tutorials are excellent (and also for 3ds Max) and Krispy1000’s tutorials are also well regarded for Blender. Just pick a 3d modelling tool from these and stick with it (important).

For flight modelling, really your best bet is starting with AirWrench 2 which takes the parameters you supply and turns out a working flight model. Just like that. If that sounds too easy, you need a lot of data for it to build a competent flight model. The software includes documentation. The dedicated .air file editors come later when you understand better what to edit and why to tweak the flight behaviour.

That should keep you out of mischief for at least 5000 hours. Not kidding, you have a heap to learn!
That is what I have expected, a lot of learning. I already planned in my head how much learning it would take. I will rather stick with Blender since it is free to use and gonna stick it for the rest of my life I guess. Thanks for the info!
Another question. Is making military jets the same as making civilian ones, but of course, different aerodynamic coding b******* etc. ?
 

gfxpilot

Resource contributor
#5
Hairpin is absolutely right. Take each point you made. Using blender.... Fine. Now the learning curve . Creating Aircraft is like my other building, engineering, landscape..... Loads of bits to create the whole. 3D modeling for gauges is just part of "the bits". To do any of these in blender will require research into plans, photographes and how to translate these into blender. Those "other sites" contain a mine of good solid information. Looking at how others have created their creations is always a good start , but learning the errors is vital as it helps with problem solving. Consider the simple creation of a wooden block style model and put wheels on it, make it move. You have the very basic function. Baby steps, loads of the and fail and bags full of patients.
 
#6
What about coding aerodynamics? I am not planning on buying anything because this is gonna be a free project, without any kind of payware special software.

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#7
for start you can use existing default aircraft aerodynamic (aircraft.cfg and air file) than close enough with your model.
 

hairyspin

Resource contributor
#8
What about coding aerodynamics?
... and your project is now up to an estimated 15,000 hrs. :oops: Seriously, you're talking the more rarified strata of the FS world; much better to start off on more modest ambitions. Getting to the moon is a long series of things to be done (a very long series), but best think how you're getting off the ground first – and if you can then stay above ground.
 
#9
What about coding aerodynamics?
... and your project is now up to an estimated 15,000 hrs. :oops: Seriously, you're talking the more rarified strata of the FS world; much better to start off on more modest ambitions. Getting to the moon is a long series of things to be done (a very long series), but best think how you're getting off the ground first – and if you can then stay above ground.
Do you think I really care how much time do I need to make the model? I didn't even meant to make the whole thang in 1 year, what did you thought?

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Heretic

Resource contributor
#10
Do you think I really care how much time do I need to make the model? I didn't even meant to make the whole thang in 1 year, what did you thought?
The question is not about realistically estimating how long a project will take, but finding the discipline for what is essentially a second job. This is especially true if you still need to learn the tools of the trade.

Most of my development stuff was done during my student days and times of unemployment, but with a regular 9-to-5 job out of town, a laptop and only two or three hours of time to waste a day, I just can't work in my development rhythm anymore, which included hours worth of modeling, texturing or coding sessions without (many) breaks.
While two or three hours a day doesn't sound too bad to get things done, it's way too little to build up a flow or getting your mind "into it", even if you already possess the necessary skills.

I can only repeat what Tom said: Do things step by step. Start with an airport for getting used to 3D modeling and texturing, then do a soundset for an already exisiting aircraft or improve the systems of one to learn the basics of the flight model and coding, then improve the flight dynamics and once you have all these things down, you can start with a full blown aircraft project of your own.
Why the piecemeal approach? Because you essentially are not going to get any practical assistance outside of forum posts. Decvelopers are scarce resource and the majority of the community consists of mindless consumers who will hail you as a talented messiah if you manage to get the number of rivets on a wing panel right and nag you for a release date concession or "suggestions" for your next project.
 
#11
Do you think I really care how much time do I need to make the model? I didn't even meant to make the whole thang in 1 year, what did you thought?
The question is not about realistically estimating how long a project will take, but finding the discipline for what is essentially a second job. This is especially true if you still need to learn the tools of the trade.

Most of my development stuff was done during my student days and times of unemployment, but with a regular 9-to-5 job out of town, a laptop and only two or three hours of time to waste a day, I just can't work in my development rhythm anymore, which included hours worth of modeling, texturing or coding sessions without (many) breaks.
While two or three hours a day doesn't sound too bad to get things done, it's way too little to build up a flow or getting your mind "into it", even if you already possess the necessary skills.

I can only repeat what Tom said: Do things step by step. Start with an airport for getting used to 3D modeling and texturing, then do a soundset for an already exisiting aircraft or improve the systems of one to learn the basics of the flight model and coding, then improve the flight dynamics and once you have all these things down, you can start with a full blown aircraft project of your own.
Why the piecemeal approach? Because you essentially are not going to get any practical assistance outside of forum posts. Decvelopers are scarce resource and the majority of the community consists of mindless consumers who will hail you as a talented messiah if you manage to get the number of rivets on a wing panel right and nag you for a release date concession or "suggestions" for your next project.
I am in my early teen ages right now, so I do not need to focus about a part-time job yet. But this iy gonna be a volunteer work by myself or more people if anybody would like to teach me a little about 3D modelling and helping me out with the project without being paid. As I said, it is a volunteer work, not for money. And I am not planning on making it like super-duper fast af BOI...so, I first need to learn 3D modelling, if I make a plane (in my case, the MiG 21) then I will be trying to work first on the exterior, then the interior, after that details, and finnaly work on the aerodynamics (which they won't be that realistic of course, unless if I can make a negociation with my school to cooperate with my project and then if possible, to cooperate with the Air Force of my country or somebody that is experienced with the Fishbed)
And I am a fast learner with that kind of stuff, and I have a lot of understanding of the 3-dimensional world in my brain.
I have posted a topic on the Project Recruitment or whatever that part is called. You will have enough info if your interested in teaching other people like me!

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#12
we aren't a teacher, we still learning, we support and help anyone want to learn.
cause some of us has experienced while creating something in sim, so we give a better "path" to start. some of us have our long way path to get their aircraft work in sim as they want.

for modeling is easy as there many tutorial available in youtube (or similar)
aerodynamic, sound, code is not much available. only forum like this can get a help from other.

for new developer, understand the flow of process is important.
insert a model in to sim isn't hard, but for new developer mostly have difficulties through this process, next step add animation work in sim, make texture ... it same flow as @Heretic said. understand the flow process.
start with simple things, check if it work as intended.
 
#13
Ok big guy

Listen carefully, you were talking with some of my dearest friends and also my Senseis. They are the best in the world in this hobby/industry and without any doubt they know exactly what they are talking about.

Wanna to begin? There you go:
https://www.fsdeveloper.com/forum/resources/blender2fsx-toolkit-getting-started-guide.191/

Then, this guide made by Ronald (of tons of good bits of information here in fsdeveloper):
https://www.fsdeveloper.com/forum/threads/wip-general-dynamics-“yf-16-prototype”-project.440049/

After that, make your self more intuitive about this website: dig in and browse it!!!

That's were you need to look first and stop talking.
Sergio.
:twocents::twocents::twocents:
 
#14
One step at a time. Do what you need for the moment. Worry about the rest till you need it. For now, start working on the model. Just model making is a HUGE field. Then learn the rest. Just my humble input on that.
 

hairyspin

Resource contributor
#15
You have youth and enthusiasm and a lot of useful pointers in the posts above, so make use of them. Get busy! It’s a lot of fun, but a lot of work too, and you’ll find people more likely to help when you’ve done some learning and some work first. My first project took me years.
 

gfxpilot

Resource contributor
#16
Simpilot. It looks like just about everyone is saying the same thing here. Hats off to you for a full throttle enthusiasm. However, as hairpin says and I echo it. I've taken blender on this year. Id love to create an aircraft but I'm starting on more basic lines such as ground vehicles, buildings and eye candy. It develops skills, problem solving and use of every increasing toolsets in blender and paint packages. Others here I guess, will say the same kind of thing.

Sit down, trawl the site here, speak to some who have/are creating AC's and ask nicely for their opinions. In the mean time seek some of the great YouTube tutorials out there on creating anything to gain some insights . Good luck.
 
#17
Simpilot. It looks like just about everyone is saying the same thing here. Hats off to you for a full throttle enthusiasm. However, as hairpin says and I echo it. I've taken blender on this year. Id love to create an aircraft but I'm starting on more basic lines such as ground vehicles, buildings and eye candy. It develops skills, problem solving and use of every increasing toolsets in blender and paint packages. Others here I guess, will say the same kind of thing.

Sit down, trawl the site here, speak to some who have/are creating AC's and ask nicely for their opinions. In the mean time seek some of the great YouTube tutorials out there on creating anything to gain some insights . Good luck.
Yes, I know. I said and am aware of that it will take a lot of time to master this skill. I am aware of the time that it will take me to make a fully workable simulation, too. I also thought about familiarizing myself first with the files that are done already. I heard also from other forums that you need some background knowledge with the SDK...
And thanks for the compliment


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