Video Card Advice

scruffyduck

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Looks like you can handle the change over of the card yourself, since you did the Hard Drive change. The only other suggestion I have is to uninstall the nvidia driver first (full windows uninstall remove driver), remove the old card, install the new and the reinstall the driver software. Should not really make a difference, but better to be safe and not have driver issues later.

The windows uninstall should be fine, but if you need to completely remove it, there are free utilities to help with that also.
 

scruffyduck

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Thanks Ron - I have a good uninstaller

DDU? You are tantalizing me with acronyms :)
 

rhumbaflappy

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Hi Jon.
Moving forward, it's looking like a card with 8GB is going to be the standard. NVidia cards are expensive at 8GB. The are some RX580 Radeon cards that will work under $200 US:
https://www.newegg.com/p/pl?N=100007709 600494828 4017&Order=PRICE

I've had AMD Radeon cards in the past... they are OK, but maybe not up to the specs of the NVidia cards. Both P3D and Dos Equis use lots of video memory, and the way cards are set up, they will use system memory if the card maxes out.
 
In 2017 I built my last pc with a 4GB XFX Radeon RX 460 Passive Heatsink Edition.
After 6 months of trouble, I sold it and bought a 1050TI running fine till now.
(I wanted a very silent card, but the 1050Ti is also silent enough)
So everybody has its own opinion of this stuff :)
 

Heretic

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DDU? You are tantalizing me with acronyms :)
Display Driver Uninstaller uninstalls video card drivers and cleans up afterward.


However, Windows 10's driver management and NVidia's installer have gotten good enough that I very rarely, if ever, need to use it.


By the way: I ran a GTX1060 on a mainboard with a Z87 chip without issues. If you can find one of those (maybe used?) within your budget range, make sure to go for the 6 GB version. It should hold up for a few more years if you don't want to use 4k resolutions.

Anything with a "50" in the name by NVidia is a bit of a hard sell. And the 1660 is just a warmed over 1060.
 
To throw my 2c into the pot, I know where you are coming from. Just like you, I never buy the latest or the greatest out there.

Last year I upgraded my graphics card for a nVidia 1060 Gamers Edition. The reason I went for the "Gamers Edition" is because it has 6Gb of RAM instead of the standard 4Gb. Extra RAM in any graphics card is always welcome! The graphics card has three outputs: 2 x HDMI and 1 x DVI. No VGA anymore! If I had to do the same upgrade now, I will probably go for the 1660, which is slightly better.

I have recently plugged a second monitor onto my system and the graphics card runs both equally well. My main monitor runs on HDMI and the second older monitor on DVI. Having a second monitor is a real plus when it comes to work. You can open files on both monitors and easily copy and paste between the screens.

If your monitor does not support HDMI or DVI, there are plenty of converters around that will allow you to connect any older monitor to any newer graphics card.

Hope this helps you.
 

scruffyduck

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To throw my 2c into the pot, I know where you are coming from. Just like you, I never buy the latest or the greatest out there.

Last year I upgraded my graphics card for a nVidia 1060 Gamers Edition. The reason I went for the "Gamers Edition" is because it has 6Gb of RAM instead of the standard 4Gb. Extra RAM in any graphics card is always welcome! The graphics card has three outputs: 2 x HDMI and 1 x DVI. No VGA anymore! If I had to do the same upgrade now, I will probably go for the 1660, which is slightly better.

I have recently plugged a second monitor onto my system and the graphics card runs both equally well. My main monitor runs on HDMI and the second older monitor on DVI. Having a second monitor is a real plus when it comes to work. You can open files on both monitors and easily copy and paste between the screens.

If your monitor does not support HDMI or DVI, there are plenty of converters around that will allow you to connect any older monitor to any newer graphics card.

Hope this helps you.
Yes indeed. Thanks very much
 
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